Flag of Slovakia

Slovakia Flag

Slovakia Flag

The flag of Slovakia is a horizontal tricolor with white, blue and red bands from top to bottom. In the left center portion of flag, partially overlapping the red and white bands, but mostly on the blue band, is a shield emblem. The shield depicts a red background with a white cross that has two crossbars. The bottom third of the shield is a blue, cloud-like formation. White, blue and red colors are common in Slavic nation flags. This flag was adopted in 1992, but can be traced back to 1848 and the revolution then.

The current Slovakian flag sans the coat of arms would look exactly the same as the modern Russian Federation flag, and in fact, the coat of arms was added to the traditional colors in 1992 to distinguish it. The previous flag was the flag of Czechoslovakia, which was in the same colors, but was in the design of a white horizontal band on the top and a red one on the bottom. The left part of the flag was taken up by a blue triangle on its side with the point facing in. This flag was in use between 1945 and 1992 and between 1920 and 1939. Between 1939 and 1945, a special war ensign was used to represent the country. This flag was a white, blue and red horizontal tricolor with a white shield in the middle bearing a black cross with two crossbars.

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Before the formation of Czechoslovakia, the flag was a simple white, blue and red horizontal tricolor. This flag represented autonomous Slovak land, the World War Two Slovak Republic and the Slovak Republic that lay inside Czechoslovakia. Before that period, the Slovak Soviet Republic flew a simple red flag with no design. In 1848, the very first Slovak flag was a white and red flag, while under Hungarian rule. Later, the Slovak revolutionaries added blue to the flag.

Like many other areas of the world, such as Pan-African and Pan-Arab, the Slavs have their own colors. These are called the Pan-Slavic colors and are red, blue and white. These colors were based on Russia’s flag and originated in the 17th century.