Flag of Jersey

Jersey Flag

Jersey Flag

Located in the largest of the southernmost Channel Island, Jersey is found slightly west of the French Cotentin peninsula. Bailiwick of Jersey, or Jersey, has many interesting national facts. The island of Jersey’s flag, for example, includes fascinating details as it is steeped in a rich history.

The Jersey flag includes a white background. Over the white background is found a red cross, whose corners touch the four separate corners of the flag making four separate triangles. Found in the top triangle is a red shield housing a yellow crown, and three tigers. The three tigers are a link to England.

The red cross, or St. Andrew’s Cross, was used during wars between England and France as a sign of neutrality. Prior to St. Andrew’s Cross, historians suggest a red cross of St. Patrick was flown on the Jersey flag. The link to St. Patrick’s cross can be found from the arms of the FitzGeralds, and Irish family with land in Jersey. The red cross was used during the German Occupation during World War II as a means of retaining a Jersey identity. The Nazi flag was flown on all public buildings during World War II, but the red cross was allowed to be displayed by local population.

The move for a new flag was instigated in 1977. Many indicated a desire to have a distinctive flag for Jersey as the previous flag was simply used, many believed, because it was a tradition. The issue with the tradition, to the minds of many, was the flag was not distinctive. A great body of support fell behind the idea of having the flag contain three leopards, or les trois leopards, a symbol to the island. Others indicated support for two leopards on the flag, the roots of which tie back to Normandy. The current flag with three tigers appears to be a compromise of the varying opinions.

The current Jersey flag is the first one to be officially adopted. The current flag was officially hoisted in 1981 at the bicentenary celebration of the battle of Jersey. Prior to the current version of the Jersey flag, an unofficial version of the flag had been flown since the 1830’s.